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ointmentgirl:

Lewis’s law is an observation she made in 2012 that states “the comments on any article about feminism justify feminism.” Lewis has written frequently about misogynist hate directed at women online.[8]

Can we just repeat that a few more times, 

“The comments on any article about feminism justify feminism.”

“The comments on any article about feminism justify feminism.”

(Source: pinkwithlace, via lieberhonig)

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(Source: stickyembraces)

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timothydelaghetto:

turnerejg:

fleshbeing:

veralynn23

Valerie Hegarty

Famous paintings come to life in 3D sculptures of nature’s destructive tendencies.

Wow I really like this

Wow

(Source: fem-arts, via ofthebohemiansort)

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"I have no memory for things I have learned, nor things I have read, nor things experienced or heard, neither for people nor events; I feel that I have experienced nothing, learned nothing, that I actually know less than the average schoolboy, and that what I do know is superficial, and that every second question is beyond me. I am incapable of thinking deliberately; my thoughts run into a wall. I can grasp the essence of things in isolation, but I am quite incapable of coherent, unbroken thinking. I can’t even tell a story properly; in fact, I can scarcely talk."

— Franz Kafka (via wordsnquotes)

(via ofthebohemiansort)

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allesistwiedasmeer:

Pascal Mercier - Nachtzug nach Lissabon

allesistwiedasmeer:

Pascal Mercier - Nachtzug nach Lissabon

(via unglaubwuerdig)

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Foucault holding a cat

Foucault holding a cat

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Adorno nimmt ein Sonnenbad

Adorno nimmt ein Sonnenbad

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this man needs more love 
(or should I say: would have needed?)

this man needs more love
(or should I say: would have needed?)

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"Vielmehr, dass die Aufmerksamkeit gegenüber einer anderen Person ein Zeichen der Hingabe ist, ist es ein Zeichen der eigenen Regung der Seele - man erblickt sich ein Stück weit selbst, es ist mehr, viel mehr - es ist die Erweiterung der eigenen Person und die Ahnung an das, was die Welt sein könnte."

— (via unglaubwuerdig)

Photoset

artandsciencejournal:

Encased

A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.

If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.

Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.

Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.

Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.

-Anna Paluch

(via unglaubwuerdig)